Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part VII

15 04 2009

Conclusions
Lao Tzu said, “If you give a man a fish you teach him for a day, teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” It is conceivable that a superstructure could be built on this simple premise that could add “if you teach men to teach men to fish, then you feed a country.” It is exponential in its scope. Many obstacles stand in the way of creating these streams of income so that men and women can be taught to teach other men and women to “fish,” but the commitment must not be to the country as its scope, but one group of people with one set of skills at a time built together so that eventually the country will be affected in a positive way. To quote Kim and Mauborgne, “Tipping point leadership…takes a reverse course. To change the mass it focuses on the extremes: the people acts, and activities that exercise a disproportionate influence on performance. By transforming the extremes, tipping point leaders are able to change the core fast and at a low cost to execute their new strategy.” (Kim W. C. & Mauborgne, 2005, p. 152) All it really takes is one or two individuals in one or two institutions that believe that one person can truly make a difference.

References

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • Foundation Center. (2008). Freequently asked questions: What is a foundation? Retrieved December 5, 2008, from Foundation Center Web site: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/foundfun.html
  • Google. (2008). What is Adsense? [Interactive slide presentation]. Retrieved November 30, 2008, from Google Web site: http://www.google.com/services/adsense_tour/index.html
  • Hunter, J. C. (2007). Church Distributed: How the church can thrive in the coming era of connection. Longwood, Florida: Distributed Church Press.
  • Kim W. C., & Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue ocean strategy: How to create uncontested market space and make competition irrelavant. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
  • MLM Corporate. (2008). Mission and Vision for MLM Corporate Clients. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from MLM Corporate Web site: http://www.mlmcorporate.com/fru/pg/2521/default.aspx
  • Moore, M., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (Second ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, a division of Thomson Learning Inc.
  • Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. K. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Nilles, J. (2007). Some historical thoughts on the ee-learning renaissance. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-9. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • open source. (2008). In The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Open Source
  • Prosper Marketplace Inc. (2008). Prosper: Company overview. Retrieved November 12, 2008, from Prosper.com Web site: http://www.prosper.com/about/
  • Rafiki Foundation. (2007). Rafiki Foundation [Brochure]. Eustis, FL: Author.
  • third world. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from Dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third world




Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part VI

13 04 2009

Retooling and Reaching Beyond Traditional Fundraising
The above scenario is not only possible and promising but it is also repeatable in different places with different groups all over the world, and so a simple spark could start a global flame. This is the very spirit of how to apply the Blue Ocean principles in a way that would not only impact individual or corporate wealth but global impact. A Blue Ocean in this case would be a sustainable and renewable so that growth in every sector or village could and would occur. What village would not want to feed its entire people? The scenario above shows one form of traditional funding (grants) that could be retooled for a different purpose so that monies that may not be available to impact a global need could be used because they would help to facilitate the programming. When looking at the entirety of this scenario, many traditional forms of fundraising could be used to help in global initiatives even though the funding itself is not specifically earmarked for these uses. According to NPOdev, a grant-writing agency dedicated to funding work of non-profits (www.npodev.org), there can be as many as ten thousand sources of income that could be channeled in a direction that would have a global impact (J. Ansley, personal communication, November 1, 2008). Grants like these are one form of traditional funding as are foundations.. Foundations , however, are unique as a key element of funding, and could be used quite creatively. Foundations are established for the creation of programs around a certain subject, (Foundation Center, 2008). For instance there are a number of foundations that fund environmental research or the development of environmental curricula for school aged children. Why couldn’t these monies be used to facilitate programming and curricula that would have a global component? What if a school would develop environmental curricula that would teach high school students about biodiesels and alternate forms of energy and in the process they create a product that could be sold and then the proceeds given to a school down the street whose organic farming program has a local and global set of initiatives? Do you see it? Communities empowered and deployed to help other communities on a global scale; all of it funded in traditional ways.
However, what about the nontraditional means? Not every school could have an organic farm, or a biodiesel laboratory. So where can the financing come from in these instances? There are many nontraditional means of building wealth that could be used in nontraditional ways. What it takes is a global vision and a strong set of objectives that help students and learners of all ages see a bigger picture than just wealth building. A prominent church in Central Florida has captured this vision by establishing a “church distributed” model. Currently they have satellite fed worship services in 18 different locations including locations that are international. Each location has been established with a pastor on the ground to help with the needs of that community and each week, the message, music and other components of the churches programming are linked together through a satellite feed. Throughout the services, video feeds from the various places are streamed to everyone else so that the global community is seen, heard and felt in a way unlike anything that has been done ecclesiatistically before (Hunter, 2007). In the same way the following means of gathering wealth could be used to impact educational projects in the third world in innovative ways:

AdSense and Internet Advertising
Internet advertising and AdSense are staples in the internet marketing and wealth building world (Google, 2008). Companies have embraced these streams of income for more than two decades and have found them to be not only profitable but exponential in the growth of their company’s assets. At the same time, technological education is beginning in the lowest aged children and so middle school, high school and college-aged learners will have computer skills that are far beyond anything the generation preceding them would even hope to enjoy. AdSense and internet marketing can then be taught from a global perspective and utilized in a creative way to finance educational projects. What if a school forged a technological program that recreated their now typical website design class into a class where students create websites that create income that would be used to affect programming in third world countries? What if a school of technology could write curriculum that would emphasize wireless networking and raise money to established wireless internet hubs in third world areas so that more people could be educated or conduct business? What if AdSense AdWords and other forms of internet marketing were used to help create a stream of wealth that could continue to find these projects?

Multi-level Marketing Programming
Recently, at a rally for a large multilevel marketing (MLM) program, a woman stood up and said that she was going to route all of her profits for the month of April to help a local women and children’s shelter. MLM’s are some of the largest wealth building programs in America and some are even global in scale. What if an MLM could be established that would redirect a percentage of its profits to fund educational projects in third world programs? What if biodiesel or some other alternative energy source could be packaged as an MLM that would be used to create a renewable stream of income for participants as well as the third world? What if Amway dedicated a stream of income to third world educational programming? The opportunities are seemingly endless and promising and would help to bolster the mission of most MLM’s and that is to empower customers to achieve their immediate and long term goals (MLM Corporate, 2008). Here the added value would be in the long term positive ramifications of such global philanthropy.

Online Business Models and Other E-commerce
Millions of people sell their wares, automobiles, and even houses on EBay every quarter, and everyone understands the power of e-commerce. In fact, EBay established a nonprofit organization called Mission Fish that has helped non-profits raise over ninety-eight million dollars through e-commerce since 2003 (http://www.missionfish.org, 2008). In this program items can be designated for a specific charity and sold through EBay with the proceeds going to that charity. Also portions of sales can be rerouted to these organizations with the hopes of creating a stream of income for non-profit organizations. So what can be done to creatively shift so that additional streams of income can be created for the purpose of financing educational programming in third world countries? It was alluded to before that the Rafiki Foundation teaches young African women how to weave baskets and make jewelry in order to help offset some of the food costs incurred by the village that was built. However, what if those items were sold on EBay? What if it could be marketed to the world through e-commerce what the Rafiki foundation is doing? What if by buying a basket a buyer would know that it is helping a student go to school and learn a trade that will help impact their community? Again, the stream of income already exists, but if coupled with something unique it could create a renewable stream of income that would help to educate as to what is being done and how to further get involved in these programs.

Innovative Mutations of Microlending
Microlending is a relatively new phenomenon in the world of e-commerce, but it is gaining popularity quickly. The idea behind microlending is that a small project can be posted on the web and then a number of people can anonymously invest in that effort with a promised return (Prosper Marketplace Inc, 2008). How could this impact third world educational programming? What if a non-profit microphilanthropy scenario was created? What if educational and other non-profit projects could be advertised online with a proposed budget and people could give towards that project. It would allow for smaller projects to gain the finding that it would need quickly, but also it could allow large-scoped projects to be broken up into smaller segments and funded in a more non-traditional way. The possibilities here are endless because anyone anywhere in the world could donate five dollars and make a major impact towards his/her global community and remain anonymous if that is the desire.

References

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • Foundation Center. (2008). Freequently asked questions: What is a foundation? Retrieved December 5, 2008, from Foundation Center Web site: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/foundfun.html
  • Google. (2008). What is Adsense? [Interactive slide presentation]. Retrieved November 30, 2008, from Google Web site: http://www.google.com/services/adsense_tour/index.html
  • Hunter, J. C. (2007). Church Distributed: How the church can thrive in the coming era of connection. Longwood, Florida: Distributed Church Press.
  • Kim W. C., & Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue ocean strategy: How to create uncontested market space and make competition irrelavant. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
  • MLM Corporate. (2008). Mission and Vision for MLM Corporate Clients. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from MLM Corporate Web site: http://www.mlmcorporate.com/fru/pg/2521/default.aspx
  • Moore, M., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (Second ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, a division of Thomson Learning Inc.
  • Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. K. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Nilles, J. (2007). Some historical thoughts on the ee-learning renaissance. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-9. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • open source. (2008). In The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Open Source
  • Prosper Marketplace Inc. (2008). Prosper: Company overview. Retrieved November 12, 2008, from Prosper.com Web site: http://www.prosper.com/about/
  • Rafiki Foundation. (2007). Rafiki Foundation [Brochure]. Eustis, FL: Author.
  • third world. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from Dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third world




Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part V

10 04 2009

Reconstructing the Boundaries of Third World Education Financing
Much has been said to set up what will now follow, but it is important to understand the scope of the problem in order to understand what makes a viable solution. Perhaps the best place to begin in the reconstruction financing educational projects in the third world is to begin at the objectives behind the projects themselves. Could it be that the project is just too large in scope to really make a difference that is measurable? The answer is profoundly yes. If a young man in Cleveland, Ohio decides to raise money to help the homeless of Cleveland and so he organizes a campaign to end homelessness and raises twenty-five dollars, his heroic acts could be met with an alarming reality, over 25,000 people were homeless in Cleveland, Ohio in 2006 and so his efforts will only provide temporary help for a few and not the long-term solution he had envisioned. It is the same for education, so often we seek to provide a systemic solution to the problem, but establishing a means of solving the problem utilizing educational projects has many more merits in the short and long term. Like the young man from Cleveland, the educational problem in the third world is extremely wide in scope and so to break it down would be the first step in establishing a real strategy to provide resources for solvency. Instead of Cleveland, perhaps just Akron or maybe even one neighborhood, South Street and Maple could be the focus of his attention. In South Africa, the focus would be on an education program in a certain sector and a certain skill that would affect that sector. For instance, if organic or worm farming is taught in a rural area or simple health and medicine, this would make an impact beyond the learner and affect the unlearned. Consider this scenario, if in one rural area, worm farming were taught and the students were able to raise worms on a rather large scale, another area could then take these worms and implant them in the grounds of their organic farms creating produce that could then be sold or given away to the surrounding people. Now consider what might happen if a group of students from rural America learned how to worm farm and grow organic vegetables, and then traveled to Africa to teach the natives there as a part of a partnership in ee-learning with a local educational facility? Now what if those American students were funded by an environmental grant and so those monies are now affecting not only the local school yard but the world’s back yard and side streets as these few students are helping to make a dent in world hunger. Same monies, same financing, different purpose and a different scope; is it possible? The answer is an emphatic yes!

References

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • Foundation Center. (2008). Freequently asked questions: What is a foundation? Retrieved December 5, 2008, from Foundation Center Web site: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/foundfun.html
  • Google. (2008). What is Adsense? [Interactive slide presentation]. Retrieved November 30, 2008, from Google Web site: http://www.google.com/services/adsense_tour/index.html
  • Hunter, J. C. (2007). Church Distributed: How the church can thrive in the coming era of connection. Longwood, Florida: Distributed Church Press.
  • Kim W. C., & Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue ocean strategy: How to create uncontested market space and make competition irrelavant. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
  • MLM Corporate. (2008). Mission and Vision for MLM Corporate Clients. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from MLM Corporate Web site: http://www.mlmcorporate.com/fru/pg/2521/default.aspx
  • Moore, M., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (Second ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, a division of Thomson Learning Inc.
  • Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. K. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Nilles, J. (2007). Some historical thoughts on the ee-learning renaissance. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-9. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • open source. (2008). In The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Open Source
  • Prosper Marketplace Inc. (2008). Prosper: Company overview. Retrieved November 12, 2008, from Prosper.com Web site: http://www.prosper.com/about/
  • Rafiki Foundation. (2007). Rafiki Foundation [Brochure]. Eustis, FL: Author.
  • third world. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from Dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third world




Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part IV

8 04 2009

Redefining Education
Education is in need of redefining for the sake of these educational projects. More than just education or even distance education is needed in order to fully understand the scope of what this type of program will need to look like and teach. E-learning models both synchronous and asynchronous certainly have positive aspects that could help to propel a myriad of different types of programming and educational models that would have promise, but would they be effective in the third world? The question here is a simple yet profound one, how do we educate learners in the third world when they are starving or homeless, parentless, or both? How can we reach those in the squatter’s camps who have no technology whatsoever and what will it take to make a real breakthrough that is lasting? It would seem that the ee-learning model provides the most significant platform for an attempt to educate in a real world sense that will impact the culture as well as the minds of those who are learning (Eskow & Trevitte, 2007, p. 1). The Rafiki Foundation located out of Central Florida is among those groups who have tried to understand the nature of the cultural issues that Africa is facing and currently is making it their goal to construct villages where learners can live, eat and learn in an environment that is nurturing and also teaches real world skills that can help to impact the local economy (Rafiki Foundation, 2007). Skills like basket weaving, jewelry making, and others that provide a source of income and can be repeatable. It is in this model of education that they are realizing an impact that is returning to the villages outside of Rafiki (which means “friend). However, their issue is still one of funding and so the model is working on the ground, but they must continue to get support in order to keep the villages populated and teachers and students fed.
The ee-learning model is the key to understanding the impact of education in these communities. The learners need to learn those lessons that will allow them to be literate and to function in society. Math, reading, writing, and comprehension skills are vital for their survival not to mention health and well-being lessons especially around the subject of AIDS. However without the experiential component of learning key trades like farming, agriculture, technological skills, or some other form of sustaining skill, the lessons that they are learning will not amount to any sizeable impact. This is where the creative financing piece really comes into view.

REFERENCES

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • Foundation Center. (2008). Freequently asked questions: What is a foundation? Retrieved December 5, 2008, from Foundation Center Web site: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/foundfun.html
  • Google. (2008). What is Adsense? [Interactive slide presentation]. Retrieved November 30, 2008, from Google Web site: http://www.google.com/services/adsense_tour/index.html
  • Hunter, J. C. (2007). Church Distributed: How the church can thrive in the coming era of connection. Longwood, Florida: Distributed Church Press.
  • Kim W. C., & Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue ocean strategy: How to create uncontested market space and make competition irrelavant. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
  • MLM Corporate. (2008). Mission and Vision for MLM Corporate Clients. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from MLM Corporate Web site: http://www.mlmcorporate.com/fru/pg/2521/default.aspx
  • Moore, M., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (Second ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, a division of Thomson Learning Inc.
  • Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. K. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Nilles, J. (2007). Some historical thoughts on the ee-learning renaissance. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-9. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • open source. (2008). In The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Open Source
  • Prosper Marketplace Inc. (2008). Prosper: Company overview. Retrieved November 12, 2008, from Prosper.com Web site: http://www.prosper.com/about/
  • Rafiki Foundation. (2007). Rafiki Foundation [Brochure]. Eustis, FL: Author.
  • third world. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from Dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third world




Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part III

6 04 2009

THE BLUE OCEAN EFFECT
South Africa, 2006. Six American young men and women are standing in the square of  a local high school where over one thousand students attend; violence is nil, promiscuity is high, AIDS is rampant, and hope seems to be absent as these six young people interact with this large crowd. There are some who walk away, but many want to talk to the Americans and so the sit and talk about culture, money, business, and school. “If only we could get the schooling that you get in the US.” One South African student posited, “then everything would be alright, because we could learn how to care for ourselves, our neighbors, AND our country.” It was an amazing site and it provides the background for a discussion about what could be in the face of so much that is not and cannot be at this juncture in the third world, but could that paradigm be shifted?
The third world has always been in need of resources for them to shift the paradigms of poverty, rampant disease and hopelessness that have pervaded their culture for decades if not centuries, but even the best efforts of the most philanthropic organizations have not been able to really create an environment where lasting change is realized. In addition, it is obvious that a dedication to the higher education of the people of these countries is a must if global changes are going to take place: Educating farmers in Ethiopia could lead to the eventual eradication of starvation. Educating engineers and scientists in third world countries could generate funding that is available for research and academic endeavors. Educating educators in third world countries could lead to a more effective and literate workforce and that could lead to a level of prosperity within the geographical area. These are just some of the examples of what could bring real change to these impoverished nations, but the resources just do not seem to be deep enough to see these ventures through to fruition. In the words of a South African young man, “there is never enough money for us to dream.”
The problem with traditional fund-raising and philanthropy to accomplish these goals and help resource solvency for these problems in the third world is that no amount of money can be amassed that will not eventually need replenishing, and this is where the real “red ocean” issues come into play. Kim and Mauborgne in their critically acclaimed book, Blue Ocean Strategy (2005) talk about the red ocean effect of business as “focusing and accepting the key constraining factors of war – limited terrain and the need to beat and enemy to succeed – and to den the distinctive strength of the business world: the capacity to create new market space that is uncontested (blue ocean, definition added).” Quite obviously, the book is written for those trying to create a niche in the business sector, but in a very real sense, it is the same type of  sustainable resource that is needed when looking at any program of solvency for the issues surrounding third world countries. The question is, “How can a sustainable stream of income be established to support the development, implementation and evaluation of programming designed specifically to help address the major social and educational issues of the third world?” Kim and Mauborne would see this question as being of the wrong focus, they would assert that it is not a stream of income but an ocean of income so that there is a flooding of resources to address these problems not only short term but long term as well. Creating and sustaining an ocean of income takes a blue ocean strategy.

References

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • Foundation Center. (2008). Freequently asked questions: What is a foundation? Retrieved December 5, 2008, from Foundation Center Web site: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/faqs/html/foundfun.html
  • Google. (2008). What is Adsense? [Interactive slide presentation]. Retrieved November 30, 2008, from Google Web site: http://www.google.com/services/adsense_tour/index.html
  • Hunter, J. C. (2007). Church Distributed: How the church can thrive in the coming era of connection. Longwood, Florida: Distributed Church Press.
  • Kim W. C., & Mauborgne, R. (2005). Blue ocean strategy: How to create uncontested market space and make competition irrelavant. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
  • MLM Corporate. (2008). Mission and Vision for MLM Corporate Clients. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from MLM Corporate Web site: http://www.mlmcorporate.com/fru/pg/2521/default.aspx
  • Moore, M., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (Second ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, a division of Thomson Learning Inc.
  • Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. K. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  • Nilles, J. (2007). Some historical thoughts on the ee-learning renaissance. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-9. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
  • open source. (2008). In The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Open Source
  • Prosper Marketplace Inc. (2008). Prosper: Company overview. Retrieved November 12, 2008, from Prosper.com Web site: http://www.prosper.com/about/
  • Rafiki Foundation. (2007). Rafiki Foundation [Brochure]. Eustis, FL: Author.
  • third world. (n.d.). In Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 24, 2008, from Dictionary.com Web site: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third world






Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part II

3 04 2009

Introduction
In the world of education, the conversation often centers on the ideas of funding and fund-raising in one form or another. Every school in every corner of the world is in need of some level of financial windfall and long term financing scenarios that the longevity of its programming is not endangered from one generation to the next. In some cases, the financial scenarios that threaten school settings are healthy in the sense that they force the institutions to continually reinvent themselves and therefore stay attuned to the cultural changes that occur in every society over time. On the other hand, there are certain aspects of education that do not change as easily and so there are then systemic solutions that provide an avenue for educators to continue to provide a high impact education with fewer risks systemically and financially. It is a difficult balance beam to walk on in any institution of the United States. However, the dialogue here is not centered on the United States and its educational norms, morays, and systemic values, but this dialogue is geared towards answering an even more pressing question. How can the systemic values, educational tools, learning strategies and student outcomes be translated into a third world environment in a way that will make an impact on an entire country whose students are hungry for it, while remaining sensitive to the massive resource restraints that are present within a third world economy?

At this juncture, it is prudent to define the terms that are used throughout this dialogue to avoid any confusion.

•    Creative financing is defined as any finds acquisition, bank lending, or capital raising technique that differs from standard industry practices. It speaks to innovation in fund-raising ideas that defy the traditional sense of amassing capital.

•    In-the box thinking is defined as thinking that requires an adaption of existing resources to solve a problem or answer a question. Quality of ideas is not necessarily a factor, but solutions are valued only by their ability to provide solvency to a particular problem and beyond this there is little or no value.

•    Out-of-the-box thinking is defined as thinking that requires the creative adaptation of resources outside of those that are traditionally used to being solvency to a problem. Here, the quality of an idea is of value due to innovation and not merely adaptation.

•    Distance Learning is defined as an asynchronous learning environment where learners are able to utilize internet driven technologies and educational media as the catalyst for learning and completing an education program.

•    EE-learning is defined as a combination of an electronic asynchronous learning environment coupled with an experiential learning environment most commonly used to teach or emphasize a skill or skill set. A good example of this may be in the field of auto mechanics. A learner could learn the mechanical theories surrounding the inner workings of a carburetor in an online environment, and then actually assemble and disassemble one in the field under the supervision of an automotive professional.

•    Educational Media/ Technology are defined as separate entities for the purpose of this dialogue and are an important distinction to understand. Technology is defined as the mechanisms by which resources are deployed (i.e. a machine, or the Internet, or an online course room.) Educational media is defined as text, images (still and moving), sounds, and artifacts that are used as resources for the purpose of facilitating learning within a set of established objectives (i.e. An article, a film, a quiz, a lecture on cd.)

•    Educational projects are defined as the specific use of educational media and technology to accomplish an established set of goals. These goals will provide a vision that will aid in the initial analysis of needs and resources available, a blueprint by which to gauge the design, development, and implementation of course rooms and coursework, and a rubric by which to evaluate courses that have been created as to their effectiveness, impact, and adherence to the overall goals of the project itself.

•    Distributed modeling is defined as the ability for a model to be recreated in similar settings, always keeping in mind that many elements will change depending on the culture of the area being affected. The idea is to have a framework that can be built upon in a virtually limitless set of scenarios.

•    The third world is defined as the underdeveloped nations of the world, esp. those with widespread poverty.

•    Open source is defined as those resources and tools that are readily available and useable through the internet for free.

REFERENCES

  • Eskow, S., & Trevitte, C. (2007). Reschooling society and the promise of ee-learning: An interview with Steve Eskow. Innovate Journal of Online Education, 3(6), 1-4. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from Innovate Journal of Online Education Web site: http://www.innovateonline.info
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Financing Educational Projects in Third World Countries – Part I

15 03 2009

In a global economy where philanthropy is more important than ever, educational pursuits are often weighed down in its inability to find adequate funding from traditional means, and so the poor and underprivileged societies are in a downward spiral that never ceases because the funding and the educational programming are unable to connect with those in the greatest need. This 6 part series is designed to explore some creative funding models for third world education programs and to begin a dialog of how education can be structured to not merely “teach men to fish,” but exponentially “teach men to teach men to fish.” This is the key to global change that will be lasting for generations.